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Dos and don’ts of leap year proposing

28th January 2008 |By

Make the most of this ancient right granted to women that comes along only once every four years…

While there’s no reason why you shouldn’t propose on any day or year, leap year is an excellent excuse for taking the initiative. February 29th has traditional associations with good fortune and things out of the ordinary. According to folklore Lady Luck bestows special favour on any venture, business or personal, that is initiated on this day.

If you’re thinking of proposing to the love of your life, here are some important dos and don’ts…

Dos

Place Pick a proposal scenario that will appeal to him rather than just to you ‐ even if that means choosing to attend a sports event or going to his favourite type of restaurant. Set the stage for romance by using props such as champagne, chocolates, rose petals and soft candlelight.

Time Be sure to pick the right moment – wait until you’ve had a glass of bubbly, just after dessert or when relaxing in the jacuzzi.

Make it fun Write ‘Will you marry me?’ on a piece of card and give it to him to read out aloud. Then say, ‘Oh what a surprise! I’d be delighted!’

Make him pay Remind him of the traditional penalty that a man had to pay for refusing a woman’s proposal on the 29th of February – he should buy you an expensive silk dress!

Be prepared The chances are that he will say ‘yes’, but do be prepared for a ‘no’ or a ‘maybe later’. Either way, it is good to have a response ready. Now we know what the other half have to go through!

Don’ts

Timing The setting and the timing is important, so avoid bringing it up when he’s in a hurry, is tired or if his football team has just lost the match.

Ring If your man doesn’t normally wear rings or you’re unsure whether he will, try to find some other token.

Too soon If you’ve known each other for less than a year it’s probably not a good idea to bring up the idea of marriage – even if it may mean waiting another four years for the opportunity.

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