Loss of Wedding Traditions

Written by    Last updated: May 16, 2016

Fascinating findings from our latest survey of 2,000 brides and grooms-to-be show not just a fall but a loss of wedding traditions being followed today. Fewer couples now choose to carry a lucky silver sixpence, jump over the broom or toss the garter.

The survey findings show today’s brides and grooms are now choosing to follow just a handful of traditional wedding customs – many do still wear a veil, through their bouquet and cut the cake but there has been a loss in many other wedding traditions that have been followed for centuries.

Jumping over the broom

1% of today’s brides and grooms said they were planning to jump the broom, though some couples still do. The act of jumping over a broom is said to symbolise the sweeping away of the old life and welcoming in the new. Historians disagree on the roots of this unusual tradition, many believing it originated in Ghana and has long been part of African culture. 99% of our brides and grooms surveyed told us they were not planning to jump the broom on their wedding day.

Jumping the broom image courtesy of Pinterest | Confetti.co.uk

Jumping the broom image courtesy of Pinterest

Carrying a lucky silver sixpence

19% of brides surveyed said they were planning to carry a lucky silver sixpence on their wedding day. Carrying a lucky silver sixpence has been associated with weddings since the 16th century and according to tradition, if a bride carries a sixpence, along with four other lucky items with her on her wedding day, she and her groom will live happily ever after. These items were said to symbolise prosperity of the past, optimism for future, borrowed good fortune from a happily married friend or family member, love, modesty, fidelity and wealth. “Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue and a silver sixpence in her shoe.” Over 80% of today’s brides will not follow this custom.

Tossing the garter

5% of brides now ‘toss their garter’, more brides prefer to toss their bouquet.The bride’s garter was said to be prized as a love tokens with magical properties. The groom would remove the garter and toss it over his shoulder for a male wedding guests to catch, who would then pin it to his hat for good luck! Over 95% of brides today do not plan to toss their garter but will probably still wear one.

This is the 21st century, we make our own rules when it comes to wedding etiquette. Loss of wedding traditions data taken from The Wedding Report survey by Confetti.co.uk of 2,000 polled brides and grooms-to-be during 2015.

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Editor’s notes – Confetti.co.uk:
Confetti.co.uk is the UK’s biggest wedding accessories retailer and the ultimate resource for planning a wedding. Launched in 1999, the brand is a trusted favourite amongst brides-to-be and those involved in planning a wedding. Their annual Win Your Wedding competition is the highest valued wedding competition in the UK, offering one lucky couple the chance to have a celebrity-worthy wedding free of charge. The competition is free to enter and open to UK residents over the age of 18 years old.

Marketing & PR | For high resolution images and further information, please contact our PR team: pr@confetti.co.uk

This article was written by

Kate Thompson
Kate Thompson is Confetti's features editor and wedding expert, and has worked in the wedding industry for 15 years. A widely published lifestyle writer, she has made BBC television and radio appearances discussing wedding trends in the UK.

Comments

One thought on “Loss of Wedding Traditions

  1. sally says:

    Jumping over the broom is weird !
    Throwing the flowers with the bride’s back to her single friends is another wedding tradition 🙂

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